Sector Expert: Daniel Jorgensen

Cellceutix Corp.

Daniel Jorgensen, M.D., MPH, is an accomplished physician executive with more than 16 years of industry experience, including 10 years at Pfizer. Previously, he was the chief medical officer at PolyMedix Inc., where he worked on brilacidin, the first in a new class of antibiotics known as defensin-mimetics, and thereafter, he continued his work as a consultant to Cellceutix, before joining Cellceutix as CMO. Jorgensen has a special interest in the development of single-dose and short-course antibiotics, particularly those that can reduce the burden of antimicrobial resistance. At Pfizer, he was the global clinical leader for azithromycin, and the development team leader for dalbavancin. He began his Industry career at Pasteur Merieux Connaught, in the area of vaccine development. In these leadership roles, he has successfully ushered several products from early clinical development through full regulatory approval, both in the U.S. and abroad, playing a key role in NDA submissions and FDA advisory committee meetings. Jorgensen is a CDC-trained epidemiologist (EIS officer) and is the former CMO for the State of Montana. He received his undergraduate degree from Yale, his MD from the University of Wisconsin, his MPH from the University of Washington, and his MBA from Yale. He is board-certified in pediatrics, infectious diseases and preventive medicine.



Recent Interviews

A Small-Cap Biotech with Big Ideas for Acute Infections and Cancers: Cellceutix's Leo Ehrlich and Dr. Daniel Jorgensen (1/27/16)
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Drug development seems to move at a snail's pace, but Cellceutix Corp.'s CEO Leo Ehrlich says his company has jumped through the most time-consuming hoops of development and now has a diversified pipeline with three main drug candidates, any of which could become the lead program with new data in 2016. Ehrlich and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Daniel Jorgensen, an infectious disease specialist, discuss the candidates, beginning with the first new class of antibiotics to enter Phase 3 in skin infections in decades.



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